PPE & Safety Advice


All equipment is hired subject to the Hire Association of Europe code of practice.

Below is a breakdown of types of PPE, potential hazards they are for, options available, and the icons we use to identify the PPE required when using our hire equipment according to the Health & Safety Executive.


Eyes

Hazards: Impact from falling or flying objects, risk of head bumping, hair entanglement.
Options: A range of helmets, hard hats and bump caps.

  

Head

Hazards: Impact from falling or flying objects, risk of head bumping, hair entanglement.
Options:
A range of helmets, hard hats and bump caps.


Breathing

Hazards: Dust, vapour, gas, oxygen-deficient atmospheres.
Options: Disposable filtering face-piece or respirator, half- or full-face respirators, airfed helmets, breathing apparatus.

Hands & Arms

Hazards: abrasion, temperature extremes, cuts and punctures, impact, chemicals, electric shock, skin infection, disease or contamination.
Options: Gloves, gauntlets, mitts, wrist-cuffs, armlets.

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Protecting the body

Hazards: Temp. extremes, adverse weather, chemical/metal splash, spray from pressure leaks/spray guns, impact/penetration, contaminated dust, excessive wear or clothing entanglement.
Options: Conventional/disposable overalls, boiler suits, specialist protective clothing, high-vis clothing.

  

Feet & Legs

Hazards: Wet, electrostatic build-up, slipping, cuts and punctures, falling objects and dropped objects, metal and chemical splash, abrasion.
Options: Safety boots and shoes with protective toe caps and penetration-resistant mid-sole, gaiters, leggings, spats.

Protective-Footwear


Printed operating instructions are given with all items hired. We recommend that the appropriate items of personal protective equipment (PPE) and other protective clothing be worn at all times when using or operating hired equipment.

PPE is equipment that will protect the user against health or safety risks at work. It can include items such as safety helmets and hard hats, gloves, eye protection, high-visibility clothing, safety footwear and safety harnesses. PPE should be used as a last resort. Wherever there are risks to health and safety that cannot be adequately controlled in other ways, the Personal Protective Equipment at Work Regulations 1992 require PPE to be supplied.

To make sure the right type of PPE is chosen, consider the different hazards in the workplace and identify the PPE that will provide adequate protection against them; this may be different for each job. Ask your supplier for advice on the types of PPE available and their suitability for different tasks. In some cases, you may need to get advice from specialists or from the PPE manufacturer.